ART

Free Admission: Affordable Art Fair New York

No CommentsPosted March 22, 2016 by Emily McInnes

EYE BUY ART
AFFORDABLE ART FAIR NEW YORK

March 31th to April 3rd

Booth 2.10

Metropolitan Pavillion
125 West 18th Street
(between 6th and 7th Avenues)

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Friends and Collectors,

I’m very excited to let you know that I’ll be participating in the Spring edition of the Affordable Art Fair, taking place at the Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea next week! This will be my third time participating in this fair, and this one feels particularly special. Here’s a few things to look forward to, dear art lover…

3 THINGS TO WATCH OUT FOR AT THE AFF SPRING EDITION:


Ryan Schude

“Pool Party” from the series Tableau
38×61″ | ed. 5

1. I have two brand new, large-format pieces I’ll be showing by Ryan Shude, who you’ll remember did the incredible “Diner” and “Jaguar” photographs that I launched my site with back in 2009! He now has over 80,000 instagram followers or something crazy. Send me an email for more details.

Julia Callon
“Work” from a series currently in progress
35×51″ | ed. 5

2. Julia Callon, one of our biggest success stories, has created an elaborate new piece called “Work”, specifically for this fair. This image adds to the ongoing series, which also includes “Supermarket” and “Royal Bank”. This photograph has been a year in the making, which is no surprise when you consider that each element you see is made by hand, in miniature. I have much to say about this artist and her work.


Kristin Sjaarda
“Red Roses and Pomegranates II”
from the series T
he Kitchen Window” (de Keuken Finster)
48×33″ | ed. 5

3. I’m introducing the work of two new artists, one of whom includes Kristin Sjaarda (above) based here in Toronto. I’m absolutely gushing over this work, and will have both of Kristin’s images printed large on cotton rag and suspended in a beautiful floater frame. I could eat these photos alive they are so luscious!

Check out my Instagram for more images!

PLEASE NOTE: these images will not be released online in wider editions. Are you from out of town or can’t make it to the fair? Not to worry. I have this whole online selling thing nailed. Send me a note if you would like jpgs and more detail about the work. I can even mock artwork up on your wall if you send me a snapshot of your space.

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FREE ADMISSION

The fair runs from March 31st – April 3rd at the Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W. 18th Street in Chelsea. Look for us on the second floor, booth 2.10. We have 15 general admission tickets available to give away. Please send an email to emily@eyebuyart.com to claim yours.

Happy Spring!


Emily McInnes
Founder and Director
EYE BUY ART

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EYE BUY ART from Generation Next

Comments OffPosted November 16, 2015 by michael

Hannah Campbell “Cohere”, 2013 from the series Arctic Fiction
24×20″ | 40×30″ | 50×40″ 
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Hannah Campbell “Transmute”, 2013 from the series Arctic Fiction
24×20″ | 40×30″ | 50×40″ 
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You know, I work with emerging artists all the time. It allows me a privilege – which is the window it provides into the issues that our next generation of artists care about – the issues they identify with, and feel compelled to talk about through their work. Coast Salish B.C. artist Hannah Campbell is a great example of this certain sense of rightness I feel with the world, knowing that these are the people to whom we are passing the baton on to.

These photos are part of a larger series titled Arctic Fiction, taken during an artist residency in Svalbard, Norway in the Arctic Circle, where she was with 27 other artists. The series documents the changing and dynamic landscape of the Arctic, one that is quickly and forever altered due to climate change. For Hannah, travelling through the arctic and photographing the land felt like she was witnessing a changing history, and one she felt compelled to document:

“The Arctic that I saw will not be the same arctic that future generations will see. The title Arctic Fiction reflects how many people treat the natural environment as far away, almost fictional places that they don’t need to protect or look after. Although we utterly depend on them for our own survival, we often feel detached from our environmental surroundings.” (Read more here).

After first showing this work at our booth during the Fall edition of the Affordable Art Fair in New York City, Canadian artist Hannah Campbell’s two images, “Cohere” and “Transmute”, from the series Arctic Fiction are now available for purchase online.

ARTIST BIO

Hannah Campbell is a Coast Salish Territories artist based in Vancouver, BC. Hannah completed her B.F.A at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2012, and has exhibited work throughout Vancouver and parts of North America. Her work won the Canon Photography Award in 2012, and the Gordon Smith Top Visual Artist award in 2008. She was among 27 artists selected to attend The Arctic Circle Residency in Svalbard, Norway in 2013, and was recently chosen to participate in the Sointula Art Shed Residency in Sointula BC. Hannah uses art as a medium to share stories, and weave together collective experiences between the viewer and her subjects.

AFFORDABLE ART FAIR NEW YORK CITY


A HUGE thank you to our collectors, old and new, who came to visit our booth at the Affordable Art Fair in New York this fall. Our most successful fair to date – thank you! I’d also like to gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country / Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

 

IN THE NEWS

I was honoured to be featured in the article  ”Buying and Collecting Fine-Art Prints: What You Need to Know to Get Started” in the October edition of Photolife Magazine! A special thank you to their team, Valérie Racine, Jenny Montgomery and Vèronica Gill for the opportunity!

Happy art collecting times, and hope you’re enjoying this lovely late autumn weather where you are too!


Emily McInnes
Founder and Director
EYE BUY ART

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An Ode to Summer in Fine Art Form

No CommentsPosted September 1, 2015 by Matthew

 

Anastasia Cazabon (Untitled) Running, 2008 from the series From The Secret World
16×20″ | 20×24″ | 30×40″ | 40×50″
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Anastasia Cazabon (Untitled) Legs In Bushes, 2009 from the series Love and Rivalry
16×20″ | 20×24″ | 30×40″ | 40×50″
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There is something about these photographs that triggers something deep, like something within my DNA. They are so evocative of being a kid, on the threshold of growing up; the mystery of life that is unfolding, and what is to come. Being carefree, full of anticipation, fear and fearlessness. These photographs are like a portal in time, to a place where we are invincible and time is everlasting. Anastasia Cazabon, an artist and filmmaker from Boston, describes the work in her artist statement:

These images are based on my own childhood, specifically the transitional period between the ages of 9 and 15. This period of liminality, when girls are on the threshold of womanhood, can be one of the most defining and vital stages in a woman’s life. In this stage of life, young women become acutely aware of the world around them and how they are portrayed within this world; physical appearance is suddenly pushed into the spotlight and with that comes insecurity, excitement, jealousy and narcissism.

These images revolve around the secret, yet everyday lives of adolescent girls.  The power of this transformative time is characterized by the struggle to reconcile one’s girlhood while moving into womanhood – an experience that elicits strong feelings of both fear and longing.

ARTIST BIO

Anastasia Cazabon is a photographer and filmmaker from Boston, MA. She is a graduate of Massachusetts College of Art and New England School of Photography. She constructs narratives revolving around mystery and the surreal. Her work explores the private moments in life, and turns the mundane into the extraordinary. She draws inspiration from dreams, memories and fairy tales. Past photography exhibitions include Photography Next Generation at The Eleni Koroneou Gallery and a solo exhibition at The National Museum in Gdansk. She was awarded Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward: Emerging Photographers in 2009.

AFFORDABLE ART FAIR NEW YORK

We are excited to be taking part again, in the fall edition of the Affordable Art Fair in New York! The fair runs from September 10th – 13th at the Metropolitan Pavillion, 125 W. 18th Street in Chelsea. Look for us on the second floor, booth 2.19. We have a limited number of general admission tickets available to give away. Please send an email to emily@eyebuyart.com to get yours while they last.

Welcome to September and the new, new year!

Emily McInnes
Founder and Director
EYE BUY ART

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7 Hanging Styles for Your Art Collection!

No CommentsPosted July 22, 2015 by Matthew

 

 

I have artwork tucked into every crevice of our house. Under the couch, in the closet, stuffed in drawers and, yes, still sitting unframed in the package it arrived in – guilty as charged! Collecting art is the easy part; getting down to hanging them on the wall can be something else entirely. So, it being summer, and a time when things tend to slow down, I’ve decided to tackle the art of hanging art. Below are my top tips to help get you started!

ONE | THE HERO WALL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a good place to begin – this is the first piece you look at as you walk into the room, and it can be the piece that the rest of your collection is hinged upon. This is the artwork that, for whatever reason, makes you weak in the knees and makes you feel proud to own it. It’s worth investing in at least one, large-scale piece, that will make a big impact (if budget is an issue, you can always ask about payment plans, or crowd-source for your next birthday). Hang this piece at eye-level (most people make the mistake of hanging artwork too high), and use a simple frame with clean lines to let the work speak for itself. Apartment Therapy has a great post with instructions on exactly how high your artwork should be hanging.

TWO | THE DIPTYCH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A diptych (two works of art that are intended to be hung next to each other) is a great way to fill up a long wall, and can be the perfect solution for a hallway, a front entry or for that awkward wall adjacent to the staircase. The images compliment each other and tell a story, and can be combined with other artworks to really get a narrative going. Whatever you do, don’t hang diptychs one higher than the other – even on a staircase. Leila Syed-Fatemi’s Zainab | & Zainab || from the series Clothbound is a great example of a diptych, and for a wall of four, hang them with Alma Haser’s to start building your portraiture collection.

THREE | ON A LEDGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have a very formal, or modern room, then hanging art in a more casual way can help offset the austerity. Lean pieces of different heights along a mantle, rather than hammering into the wall. This gives you flexibility, allows you to move the work around – and avoid nailing into the plaster in some cases. You can also mingle in some treasured, vintage family photos, mix it up with bits of colour, or stick to strictly black and white.

FOUR | SALON STYLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is your hallway a boring trip, or an exciting journey? Exciting journey of course! Corridors are the perfect place to hang a menagerie of art, or, to fill up a vast amount of wall space and build as you go. Mix and match artworks of different sizes – 16″x20″, 20″x24″, even 30″x40″ – or hang different mediums together; a precious little painting, a hand-carved mask, mixed media and photography. There’s many different ways to approach a salon wall, and if you want more ideas check out our Pinterest page dedicated purely to the art of salon.

FIVE | FRAME TO FRAME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are accustomed to condo or apartment living, ample wall space may be hard to come by. We need not be formal, as there really are no rules when it comes to hanging art on your walls. Try hanging frames side-by-side, with little-to-no wiggle room in between. A frame to frame arrangement is helpful in front vestibules, bathrooms, or any other room where space is limited. This type of compact arrangement will help keep your artwork out of storage and on the wall!

SIX | FRAMES WITHIN FRAMES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have seen this idea featured on a number of blogs, and at first, wasn’t so enthusiastic. However, I think it can make a lot of sense for a busy work space, a kid’s room, or a home office where you might want to instill some order. Find a large frame (try flea markets or antique stores), and use it as a backdrop for other photographs and artworks. This solution can create a structured look that can add order to your chaos. You could also try placing a cork board inside the hanging frame, and use it to pin other little bits of inspiration.

SEVEN | FLOATING SHELVES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Floating shelves are a great way to build flexibility into your exhibition space, allowing your collection to expand as you go. Try layering pieces of different sizes, colours and mediums together, and let go of the impulse to match the artwork to your decor. Avoid cluttering up the shelves by adding a lot of knick-knacks, they will detract from the overall impact. Stick to black and white photographs, or add colour to a neutral space – whatever you choose, make art the focal point.

BONUS TIP

Add equal parts gin and tonic to an ice filled glass, and sit in the space where you want the artwork to go. Sometimes hanging out with the blank canvas gives a chance for those ideas to expand (art-installtion related or otherwise).

A very special thank you to Matthew Beal, our Digital Marketing Intern for his contribution to this post, and for the very snazzy drawings you see here! For more tips on how to hang your art, check out our Pinterest page.

Happy Hanging,

Emily McInnes
Founder and Director
EYE BUY ART

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EYE BUY ART celebrates Pride!

No CommentsPosted June 15, 2015 by Matthew


Mónika Sziládi Untitled (Blonde), 2011 from the series Wide Receivers
11″x14″ | 16″x20″ | 20″x24″ | 30″x40″
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Note: this is a special guest post from our Digital Marketing Intern, Matthew Beal – welcome Matt!

WORLD PRIDE SEASON
NYC June 23 – 28, 2015
TORONTO June 18 – 28, 2015
LONDON June 21 – 28, 2015

As lovers of art and photography, we understand the power images wield in shaping the ways we think and feel about human culture. A compelling photograph can dramatically shift our perspective, and open new possibilities for experience and exploration. This is the work of image-makers; to expand the collective imagination and to make visible our humanness, in all its colourful diversity!

So, whether you are vacationing in Venice, or BBQing on a rooftop in Brooklyn, the month of June is host to a number of Pride events in a city near you. This season carries an infectious energy that brightens the hearts and minds of people around the globe, and we are thrilled to join communities everywhere in celebration of LGBTQ. Make sure to check out what’s happening in your area, show your support, and get involved!

#gayisgood

LIMITED TIME OFFER!

For the next 24 hours, we will be offering a 20% discount on Mónika Sziládi‘s “(Untitled) Blonde”, 2011. Use code Happy*Pride at checkout.

ABOUT THE WORK

In Wide Receivers I am interested in how society and human behavior are becoming simultaneously tribalized and atomized amidst the ever increasing noise of mass (over)communication, digital media, and self-broadcasting. My photographs are digital collages constructed from images that I shoot at networking events, conventions, and at meet-ups of subcultures that were formed and (or) are operating as a result of social connectivity on the Internet. Compositing and cropping the source photos heightens the intragroup dynamics and throws off the viewer’s ability to find a primary point-of-view, thus generating an underlying disruption: the participants, while appearing connected within a social network, also appear atomized in a contrived pose or uncertain gesture.

- Mónika Sziládi

Mónika Sziládi was born and raised in Budapest, Hungary and lives in New York. She holds an MFA in Photography from Yale (2010) and a Maîtrise in Art History and Archaeology from Sorbonne, Paris (1997). In 2008 she received the Gesso Foundation Fellowship to attend Skowhegan and she is a 2012 resident at Smack Mellon. She is a winner of The Philadelphia Museum of Art Photography Competition (2010), a recipient of the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship (2010), a Juror’s Pick by Julie Saul and Alec Soth, Work-in-Progress Prize, Daylight/CDS Photo Awards (2010) and the recipient of Humble Arts’ Fall 2012 New Photography Grant. Selected exhibitions include Point of Purchase, DUMBO Arts Center, NYC (2006); Lost and Found, Staatliche Kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, Germany (2007); Designations, NT Gallery, Bologna, Italy (2008); Market Forces, Carriage Trade Gallery, NYC and Galerie Erna Hecey, Brussels (2009); US Featured Exhibition, Flash Forward Festival, Toronto (2010); 31 Women in Art Photography, Hasted Kraeutler, NYC. (2012).

Thanks everyone and have a great week!

Matt

Matthew Beal
Digital Marketing Intern
EYE BUY ART

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